The Transition

The transition from high school to college marks an important milestone along the path from adolescence to adulthood. It’s a big step for you and your family that’s both exciting and, sometimes, stressful. You are exploring fuller independence and your relationships are changing, too. You may be wondering: How much support do I need? What are common transition challenges that I might face as a new college student? How will I communicate with my family and friends? What do I do to ease the transition to college if I have a preexisting health or mental health problem? These are important considerations for anyone transitioning from high school to college. Our goal is to help you thrive while adjusting to college. Read on to learn more about adjusting to college.

Changing Relationships

Starting college may be the first time you’re living away from home. This will impact relationships with your friends and members of your family in different ways. Navigate the links below to learn more about how you can stay connected to loved ones at home while embracing the new faces you meet at school.

How to Adjust to College

If you’re planning to live at school (and even if you are not), a lot of basic things in your life will change: lots of new people, more independence and freedom and new responsibilities. The opportunities, freedom and challenges of college life can feel overwhelming, but they don’t have to. Staying active, prioritizing sleep, and getting involved on campus are all steps you can take to enhance and take control of your college experience. Navigate the links below to learn more strategies for adjusting to college life.

Academic Performance and Pressure

You plan on going to college to get an education. College-level coursework can sometimes seem more academically challenging than high school. But remember, you made it in. You are prepared with the foundational skills you’ll need to succeed in college. College will allow you to build upon these skills to benefit your future professional life. Below, we review what you should know about the challenge of college academics. From dealing with competition, deciding what courses to take to how to relate to your professors, these tips will help you navigate your academic life.

Transitioning Health and Mental Health Care to College

If you are starting college and have been receiving treatment for a medical or mental health problem, there are things you can do to make sure you stay healthy while in school. If you manage your health well, you will not only feel better, but being healthy will help you succeed in school.

Special Considerations for Adjusting to College

Some students have unique needs or circumstances that can sometimes create special challenges, or at least different things to consider, when planning for college. For example: student athletes will have time pressures, first-generation college students will have less family guidance and international students may face language or cultural barriers. In this section we’ll provide guidance and tips for students with unique needs. Navigate the links below to learn more.

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